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Red Hills and Cotton

Red Hills and Cotton Red Hills and Cotton is suffused with Ben Robertson s deep affection for his native Upcountry South Carolina An internationally known and respected journalist Robertson had a knack for finding the in

  • Title: Red Hills and Cotton
  • Author: BenRobertson Lacy K. Ford
  • ISBN: 9780872493063
  • Page: 259
  • Format: Paperback
  • Red Hills and Cotton is suffused with Ben Robertson s deep affection for his native Upcountry South Carolina An internationally known and respected journalist, Robertson had a knack for finding the interesting and exotic in seemingly humble or ordinary folk and a keen eye for human interest stories his power of description and disarmingly straightforward narrative were tRed Hills and Cotton is suffused with Ben Robertson s deep affection for his native Upcountry South Carolina An internationally known and respected journalist, Robertson had a knack for finding the interesting and exotic in seemingly humble or ordinary folk and a keen eye for human interest stories his power of description and disarmingly straightforward narrative were the hallmarks of his writing.A loyal Southern son, Robertson cherished what he judged to be the South s best traditions personal independence and responsibility, the rejection of crass materialism, a deep piety, and a love of freedom He repeatedly lamented the region s many shortcomings poverty, racial hierarchy, political impotence, lack of inttellectual curiosity, and its tendency to blame all of its twentieth century problems on the defeat of the Confederacy.An informative and entertaining new introduction by Lacy K Ford, Jr associate professor of history at the University of South Carolina, provides fascinating new facts about Robertson s life and recasts his achievements in Red Hills and Cotton as social commentary Ford captures the essence of Robertson s restless and questioning, but unfailingly Southern, spirit.

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      Posted by:BenRobertson Lacy K. Ford
      Published :2019-05-02T18:26:28+00:00

    About "BenRobertson Lacy K. Ford"

    1. BenRobertson Lacy K. Ford

      Ben Robertson was a journalist, author and war correspondent during World War II He attended Clemson Agricultural College now Clemson University and graduated in 1923 with a degree in horticulture He then went to the University of Missouri and received a degree in journalism in 1926.His professional career in journalism began with a short stint at the News and Courier in Charleston His first major job after graduating was at the Honolulu Star Bulletin In 1927 he went to Australia to work for The News in Adelaide From 1929 to 1934 he reported for the New York Herald Tribune, after which he went to work for the Associated Press in New York and London In 1935 he went to the United Press and also sent stories to the Anderson Independent in South Carolina In 1937 Ben Robertson returned to AP and also did disaster relief work for the American Red Cross during the Ohio River flood of 1937.His work as a war correspondent began in 1940 covering England for the New York paper PM He worked with Edward R Murrow covering The Blitz of London In most of 1942 he roved for PM and the Chicago Sun in the Pacific, Asia and North Africa In the later part of the year he returned to the Herald Tribune and was on his way to head its London bureau when he was killed in a plane crash in Portugal in 1943.In his short life, Ben Robertson published three books The first was Travelers Rest published in South Carolina in 1938 The second was I See England, published in 1941, which told of his interaction with the British during wartime The last, his masterpiece, was Red Hills and Cotton An Upcountry Memory published in 1942.

    601 Comments

    1. This is one of the best books I have ever read. Robertson brings things to life and makes me feel like I'm right there with him. I can hear the train whistle, I can see the Blue Ridge mountains in the distance, I can see his grandparents and great aunt sitting on the piazza. Maybe it's because I'm a South Carolina upcountry boy myself, but I really resonate with all that Robertson says. He sheds so much light on the Southern perspective of life, one that is still relevant in today's south as lif [...]


    2. Red Hills and Cotton is a classic must read for anyone, especially those from the upstate South Carolina area, Mr. Robertson was gone long before I was born but his legacy lives on in his writing.Ben Robertson’s memories which he shares in this book are so familiar to me simply because we grew up in the same area, the descriptions he gives us makes you feel like you are actually there, the demeanor and mindset of his family is classic Southern and I actually could see members of my own family [...]


    3. This is a history written in the early 40s of a South Carolinian upcountry family. The author talks a lot about his family and the Southern values he grew up knowing. I particularly enjoyed matching my own Southern upbringing against his experiences - even though I was born after his book was written in another Southern state (Virginia). I found many congruences. I also enjoyed this history because it is set near the area that my husband and I chose to retire. The writing is like sitting on the [...]


    4. One of the very best books I have ever read. Having lived and gone to school in this same part of the Carolinas, I could so easily imagine my parents and grandparents on almost every page in the book. And the stories and descriptions of life back in these days helped me to further realize that it wasn't so bad back then.


    5. I am grateful for the publishers at our universities, for without them we may never have treasures like Red Hills and Cotton.


    6. Enjoyed the immensely. One of my favorite passages from the book is two of his family’s cooks talking to each other (pg. 38):Hattie got to talking about how sorry she was for Lot’s wife in the Bible. She said she understood how hard it was for Mrs. Lot not to look back, and if she’d been walking out of a city like that she’d have looked back too. ‘I got to look back,’ said Hattie. ‘Ain’t it the truth,’ said Lulu, ‘and I got to nibble the fruit.’The book is full of gems like [...]


    7. I read this book in both high school and college and could not put it down either time. It hits close to home for me, as it is about the region that I grew up in. Mr. Robertson's poetic words hit the nail on the head in describing the culture, beliefs, and history of the land he knew as home and the people he knew as friends, family, and neighbors. A must-read for any conoisseur of Southern literature.


    8. I didn't like it. The writing is too vague and sentimental. I was looking for some real southern history, not a biographical account of the idiosyncrasies of hill folk. The writing is just a mash-up of short reflections that easily slip from your mind. Maybe it makes more sense if you're from the area. And the author belies his own roots, being an educated, world traveller and writer.


    9. It was pretty interesting to read a book about the county in which I live and cities with which I am familiar. It did get a very interesting insights into the original Scots Irish settlers who's descendants have been here for 200 years.



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