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Diet Cults: The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US

Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US From The Four Hour Body to Atkins there are diet cults to match seemingly any mood and personality type Everywhere we turn someone is preaching the One True Way to eat for maximum health Paleo Diet

  • Title: Diet Cults: The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US
  • Author: Matt Fitzgerald
  • ISBN: 9781605985602
  • Page: 223
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From The Four Hour Body, to Atkins, there are diet cults to match seemingly any mood and personality type Everywhere we turn, someone is preaching the One True Way to eat for maximum health Paleo Diet advocates tell us that all foods less than 12,000 years old are the enemy Low carb gurus demonize carbs, then there are the low fat prophets But they agree on one tFrom The Four Hour Body, to Atkins, there are diet cults to match seemingly any mood and personality type Everywhere we turn, someone is preaching the One True Way to eat for maximum health Paleo Diet advocates tell us that all foods less than 12,000 years old are the enemy Low carb gurus demonize carbs, then there are the low fat prophets But they agree on one thing there is only one true way to eat for maximum health The first clue that that is a fallacy is the sheer variety of diets advocated Indeed, while all of these competing views claim to be backed by science, a good look at actual nutritional science itself suggests that it is impossible to identify a single best way to eat Fitzgerald advocates an agnostic, rational approach to eating habits, based on one s own habits, lifestyle, and genetics body type Many professional athletes already practice this Good Enough diet, and now we can too and ditch the brainwashing of these diet cults for good.

    Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US Matt Fitzgerald on FREE shipping on qualifying offers From the national bestselling author of Racing Weight , Matt Fitzgerald exposes the irrationality Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of May , Community Reviews Diet Cults surveys the scientific literature on many trendy diets like raw food, Atkins, South Beach, Zone, Paleo, Vegan, Superfoods, gluten free, as well as protein supplements and shows that almost all have no scientific merit To take the case of gluten free, most people don t even know what gluten is and, Diet Cults You are not what you eat RunToTheFinish The recruiting programs of the healthy diet cults consist almost entirely of efforts to convince prospective followers that their diet is the One True Way to eat for maximum health Matt details the lack of evidence both scientific and historical to support many popular programs claims. Diet Cults The Dieting Book Ignore Limits Diet cults will never tell you that motivation is the key to dieting success as that won t sell their book or recipe guide This is known as the dieting knowledge barrier and it s largely false. Diet Cults vs Science Based Healthy Eating Science Diet Cults vs Science Based Healthy Eating Fitzgerald covers a wide variety of topics such as superfoods, low carb, protein supplements for weightlifters, sugar, grains, dairy foods, vegetarian diets, dehydration, weight loss, severe calorie restriction for longevity, and many The book is Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of Us by Matt Fitzgerald. Beware Diet Cults Esther Avant Blog I recently read an interesting book called Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of Us The premise is that while science has established pretty definitively that humans can thrive on a variety of diets, people are still drawn to diet Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Feb , You can listen to the full audiobook Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for free at audibay F Signs That Your Diet Is A Diet Cult Triathlete Registered Dietitian Nutritionist s Book Club Review Diet The Silicon Valley Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Book Club met this month to discuss Diet Cults The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of Us by Matt Fitzgerald, a certified sports nutritionist The book explores the histories of popular diets of the modern age and an anthropological look at the evolution of mankind s diet.

    • [PDF] Download µ Diet Cults: The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of US | by ✓ Matt Fitzgerald
      223 Matt Fitzgerald
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      Posted by:Matt Fitzgerald
      Published :2018-012-12T01:00:50+00:00

    About "Matt Fitzgerald"

    1. Matt Fitzgerald

      Matt Fitzgerald is the author of numerous books on sports history and endurance sports He has enjoyed unprecedented access to professional endurance athletes over the course of his career His best sellers include Racing Weight and Brain Training for Runners He has also written extensively for Triathlete, Men s Fitness, Men s Health, Outside, Runner s World, Bicycling, Competitor, and countless other sports and fitness publications.

    240 Comments

    1. I gave it 4 stars because it was a lot of fun to read, not because I thought it was particularly insightful or well researched. In fact, I disagree with a lot of what Fitzgerald writes here and feel he missed a big piece of the diet puzzle. I am an all or nothing person and terrible at moderating. I used to consider this a fault until I realized/learned that all people are either moderators or abstainers and there is no moral superiority to either predisposition. Moderators are just that - good [...]


    2. This book is truly awful. While it has an honorable intention, to discredit many of the bogus fad diets that appear and disappear with astonishing regularity in the media, it utterly fails in its execution. The author relies on anecdotes, faulty science (correlation does not equal causation, which he states in his book, and then goes on to negate several times) and dubious sources (including an "according to " mention that made my jaw drop).Diet Cults is also not terribly cohesive or well-writte [...]


    3. I agree with the author's premise--that there is no one "perfect" diet that works for everyone, and that most of the rules and restrictions of popular diets are unnecessary, and sometimes silly. I also think that the "agnostic healthy eating" guidelines he provides in the last chapter seem sensible. And overall, the writing style is snappy and entertaining. The book could have been much better, though. I thought that the overall structure was rather disorganized (it seemed more like a series of [...]


    4. Diet Cults surveys the scientific literature on many trendy diets like raw food, Atkins, South Beach, Zone, Paleo, Vegan, Superfoods, gluten-free, as well as protein supplements and shows that almost all have no scientific merit. To take the case of gluten-free, most people don't even know what gluten is and, unless you are one of the very rare people with celiac disease, there is no reason for you to even think of gluten. If anything, Fitzgerald goes out of his way to be fair, giving the diet f [...]


    5. There were many things that I liked about Diet Cults: the cover (and I can't even articulate why), the layout, the tone, the reassurance, and the Agnostic Eating Plan.I loved the layout of Diet Cults. Each chapter addressed a different type of "diet cult" until the very last chapter, which discussed the author's Agnostic Eating Plan. Personally, I find comfort in reading a book with good, predictable cadence. There's a time and a place for thrillers and suspense, but a nonfiction book about diet [...]


    6. If you want to piss off a whole lot of people then start poking holes in their religious beliefs. This is exactly what Matt Fitzgerald has done in Diet Cults. And if you don’t think some dieters are religious just consider that they put belief in their experience ahead of any verifiable science. And just like religions, what many of these diets share is a belief that only one way of eating leads to the path of true health. If you think theological battles between Southern Baptists and Roman Ca [...]


    7. I can't say that the style of writing in this book really impressed me much but if the author was aiming to make it easy to read and accessible, I suppose he's done that. It really came across as more chatty rather than scientific, like a neighbour leaning over the fence and saying, hey did you hear about so and so? I could have gone for something a little more scientific, maybe with some better facts and figures, though I do not in general disagree with his view of these fad diets I don't think [...]


    8. This was a great book for those seeking to improve their lives! Debunks all the "diet fads" out there and promotes the main message of overall healthier eating and exercise. This book was motivational as well as informative and an interesting read about the history of food and the social/evolutionary/psychological/cultural relationship with food.


    9. There are so many fad diet books, normally based on some "One True Path" to lead the reader into the inner circle they create. This is the antithesis of those books. Part history, part nutrition science, part psychology, and all practicality. Loved this.


    10. Fitzgerald's major premise is that people don't succeed on diets because of any biological needs that make one diet more effective than another, but because adhering to a diet -- any diet -- makes you a part of a community that gives you a sense of self and a source of encouragement.I was fascinated with the way Fitzgerald plainly lays out the case against each of the diets -- Paleo, Atkins, gluten-free, raw-food, Weight Watchers, what-have-you -- while simultaneously describing the lives of peo [...]


    11. The author appropriately portrays food as fuel, not medicine. His premise is that diet cult members don't eat more pragmatically but more ritualistically. He says all anyone needs to know about weight the right amount and eating well is what a 10-year old would know. Eat more fruits and vegetables than sweets. It isn't about the food someone eats but her/his behavior that makes them overweight and feel crappy. It's about portion control and exercise. But fads offer rules and rituals so people ca [...]


    12. Diet Cults by Matt Fitzgerald gives us a strong analogy to frame the intense marketing of diets and nutritional supplements that are so common today. Fitzgerald outlines how sometimes well meaning but misguided nutrition "experts" villify healthy foods (think: potatoes, fruit) and tap into the human instinct to be a part of a group of like minded people. Fitzgerald's assessment that every diet fad promotes its plan as "The One True Way" of eating is spot on, and he clearly demonstrates over the [...]


    13. Science + Humor = my kind of book. This one has both. It’s down to earth and full of common sense, as well as some little-known facts. Like Alan Levinovitz (The Glueten Lie And Other Myths About What You Eat), Fitzgerald highlights the parallels between religious cults and diet fads. And I think he’s right on the money.There are no secrets to weight loss. There are no superfoods. There are no absolute do’s and don’ts. There’s no best diet. In fact, “no diet” is best. Bottom line: P [...]


    14. Even as a vegan I am wary of the "One True Way" evangelists in our ranks (I'm looking at you, Esselstyns and Campbells). As I may (or may not) have alluded to in my review of My Beef With Meat, I think that anyone should be able to realize that a single diet is not going to suit every person on the planet. To claim otherwise is to sink down that slippery slope of dogmatic ravings.This book hits a sweet spot with a science-backed perspective and a bit of good humor. It was a fun read and I'd reco [...]


    15. premise interesting, but utterly unoriginal and boring. I am not a cult food member. But is clear he propose exactly what he is criticizing on others. I didn't like style also, very annoying. couldn't finish.


    16. Awesome read. Fitzgerald methodically picks apart why each diet is not perfect, that there will never be a 'perfect' diet, since the human body has evolved over the years to become adaptable to whatever the hell we feed it


    17. A cult is defined at a high-level as, “a misplaced or excessive admiration for a particular person or thing.” Cults exist for nearly anything or anyone, and they do not have to be religious focused. Matt Fitzgerald intention with his book “Diet Cults: The Surprising Fallacy at the Core of Nutrition Fads and a Guide to Healthy Eating for the Rest of Us” is to point out the many different diet cults, their leaders, and why so many people blindly follow them with little or no long-term succ [...]


    18. Diet CultsMatt Fitzgerald takes leaps and bounds to make sure I understand exactly what is happening in ‘Diet Cults’ and on my end it is a great thing because this book is quite hard to understand on some levels. I originally picked up this book because I am curious about my diet and everything around the culture of a diet. I thought that I would get a guide on what to eat like a lot of other books. Diet Cults however takes a broad look at all the different diets and groups, nutrition fads a [...]


    19. If you can get past the initial "I did some research and found that endurance athletes can pretty much eat whatever they want" start to this book, there is some really good content in here. I read some of Fitzgerald's other books on running and really like his writing style, so I gave this a go. He does give a nod to the quote I've heard many times before -- if the fire is hot enough, anything will burn. But he goes much deeper than this to try to explain that there is no real single true way to [...]


    20. Although I don't agree with the notion that there is no best diet out there, I really respect Matt's opinions and beliefs on nutrition because he creates them with scientific research in mind.I really enjoyed the book because I felt as if Matt was very comprehensive in taking us through the journey of how nutrition has evolved over the years, and before reading this book my knowledge base on nutrition was very slim, so I appreciate the book for exposing me to what's been going on in the nutritio [...]


    21. This is a good fun read, rich in anecdotes - and with occasional insights - the three behavioural traits of long-term weight losers are noted - as an example. Yet the science is largely unsafe. You wouldn't want the author as your lawyer in court. He has a weird gift for proving the opposite of the case he is arguing. Faced with data that shows different control groups gain, lose and stay the same weight with exercise, he concludes that exercise can sometimes cause weight loss! In fact science w [...]


    22. This book is awesome. It uncovers the bad logic, manipulation, and partial logic (selective science) behind OCD dietary groups. The book is genius. It uses simple logic, and science and studies to defunk the myths these groups teach.It also explains why people who obsess on one idea have and find success. Its because there are many ways to be healthy. Not just one. And there is no one answer for everyone. At the end of the day, we can be OCD, or we can be balanced in our approach. I choose balan [...]


    23. If you ever felt cynical about a diet that was being presented to you or the diet your friend or family member thinks that you should follow this book is excellent! I personally found the framework of making diets akin to cults to be incredibly helpful and the tips that he listed for agnostic healthy eating to be excellent. For a more in depth review check out my blog at notanentrylevelreader


    24. This is one of the best books that i have read on healthy food. Introduction and explaining of what the healthy diet means and what are the healthy diets are really good and can understand by even a non-professional medical person. If you are a runner or a one who aiming to loose weight this books get you out of all the myths out there.


    25. A fascinating read that breaks down the confusion, myth and smugness of common diets today. Science fact is mixed evenly with anecdotal evidence and humour to provide a well balanced book that will make you question the notion today of 'perfect eating'.


    26. One of the better ones for the book group on the Serious Side of Food. Basic common sense approach to eating righteach individual has to figure out what works best for them, there is no one size fits all.


    27. This is an interesting and comprehensive look at why following a specific diet doesn't matter. He looks at every angle with regards to diet and answers them in this book. I had a chance to interview Matt Fitzgerald and here's a link to it: youtu/pYuUezxxD80


    28. A good dose of common sense (and anthropology). Entertaining read through many diet cults, ending with Chapter 15 "Agnostic Healthy Eating"—in summary, "rbids nothing, smiles upon eating for pleasure, and encourages individual choice"


    29. I quite enjoyed this. He's an excellent writer and it was refreshing to hear something sensible regarding diet, Lord knows there's enough quackery out there.



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